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Where does the Taxachusetts Label Come From, 2017 update

Massachusetts’ taxes are about average for the United States. Where then does the label ‘Taxachusetts’ come from? The answer has much more to do with history than reality.

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Partnership in Peril: Federal Funding at Risk for State Programs Relied on by Massachusetts Residents

This paper examines the major federal funding sources that the state uses to provide access to affordable health care, help children thrive, assist low-income families, and care for veterans. In addition to describing the sources of federal funding, we examine the policy changes Congress is likely to consider that could threaten this funding and the services the funding supports. This fiscal year, one of every four dollars that supports the state's budget comes from the federal government 2–close to $11 billion in federal funds.

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A Preview of the Fiscal Year 2018 Budget Challenges

This preview examines both the challenges revenue gap facing the FY 2018 budget and two budget transparency reforms that could help avoid mid-year budget cuts and other unpleasant budget surprises in the future.

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Where Does the Taxachusetts Label Come From?

Massachusetts’ taxes rank in the middle of the pack, compared to other states. Where then does the label “Taxachusetts” come from? The answer has much more to do with history than reality.

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The Effects of Skewed Growth on Household Incomes

Had earnings for people at all income levels continued to grow in line with overall income growth as occurred during the three decades before the 1980s, 90 percent of Massachusetts households would have substantially higher incomes today. This fact sheet describes how much lower incomes are as a result of growing disparities, how much larger an income share is held by the top 1 percent of income earners, and how the top 1 percent pay the smallest share of their income in state and local taxes.

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Maintaining an Effective Transportation System

This fact sheet examines information from the Department of Transportation that suggests current levels of investment are not enough to keep our roads, bridges and public transit system in good working order.

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Direct Certification for School Meals: Feeding Students, Counting Kids, Funding Schools

This brief describes a number of solutions that would improve the effectiveness of the direct certification system and its ability to accurately identify low-income students.

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Analyzing the Governor’s FY 2017 Budget

The Governor’s budget proposal for FY 2017 is best described as an austerity budget. It contains small cuts and spending reductions across government and includes few new initiatives. This Budget Monitor analyzes the budget compared to current spending levels and in the context of longer-term trends.

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The Single Sales Factor Tax Break: Has It Worked?

The Governor’s budget proposal will reportedly include the expansion of a corporate tax break called Single Sales Factor apportionment. This factsheet describes how this tax break works, the evidence on whether it is effective, and its cost.

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Incarceration Trends in Massachusetts: Long-Term Increases, Recent Progress

This paper analyzes incarceration trends in Massachusetts over the past four decades. We see progress, but also that we have a long way to go: incarceration rates are still much higher than they were before the 1980s, and a large share of those leaving prison and jail are not receiving the education and treatment programs that make their reentry into society more successful.

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